Dealing with Employees/Expert Profile


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Expertise

Doug Staneart can answer questions about gaining cooperation from, motivating, and influencing coworkers and employers. He is also an expert on how to avoid and resolve conflicts as well as other issues dealing with long term business relationships.

Experience in the area


Doug Staneart has been a speaker and trainer for over ten years specializing in public speaking, leadership training, and team building. Doug is CEO of The Leader?s Institute® (Team Building) and Fearless Presentations based in Dallas and author of the books 40 Ways to Influence People and Fearless Presentations. He has accumulated over 2700 hours of classroom coaching and training for over 400 of the Fortune 500.

Education/Credentials

BA Business Management

What do you like about this subject?

Most people instinctively know how to deal with people, but when the pressure and stress is on, we tend to do the opposite of what we know we should do. When I coach people, it is very rewarding to see them get the success that they deserve.

Something interesting about this subject that others may not know:

The number one thing that holds people back is not past failures -- it is past successes. When we succeed at specific tasks, we tend to try to recreate the actions that made us successful even if the circumstances have changed. People who are most successful in the technology age are those who realize when the successes of the past are no longer effective, and they adapt.

Something controversial or provocative about this subject

Constructive Criticism is bad and never gets good results. When was the last time someone criticized you and you thanked them enthusiastically for being on your side? Chances are, you probably resented the critic and justified your actions. If we really want to change behavior, there are smarter, better ways.


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Average Ratings

Recent Reviews from Users

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    K = Knowledgeability    C = Clarity of Response    P = Politeness
UserDateKCPComments
Della Doughty09/21/14101010Thank you Doug. You definitely gave me .....
Kate06/30/11101010Wow. What a concise response and gives .....
Sarah10/13/10101010Thanks Doug! This is great advice! What .....
slame08/08/10101010Thank you. Your answer was more than .....
Fars01/28/101010 

Recent Answers from Doug Staneart

2011-11-17 Forced Quit:

Ray,    Sorry about the delay in responding.  I typically get an email letting me know that a question has been posted, and I guess I just missed this one. Sorry.  There was absolutely nothing wrong with

2011-06-30 work problem:

Kate, It's possible that the behavior from HR and the supervisors are symptoms of something different than this particular incident.  It sounds like you might have, possibly inadvertently, rubbed someone

2010-08-07 Question About Behavior With Subordinate?:

Slame,    Oh no, you should never correct a person's behavior or call attention to their mistake in public. If you do, you'll embarrass the person and cause the person to really lose confidence in whatever

2009-11-01 Motivating employees:

Terry Marie,    Realize first that the reason that you are in the leadership position and they are not is that you have the drive and determination that they lack.  Don't expect them to be perfect, but

2009-09-11 talking:

Shawn,    If the problem really is that a few bad apples are chatting too much, then you might be able to get the group together, explain the problem and the difficult situation that you are being placed

 

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